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Kreiman Lab News

Congratulations to Jay Chandra on this thesis!

Jay Chandra

Classification of Continuous Natural Human Behavior Using Intracranial Field Potential. Jay Chandra. Harvard University (2022). 

Read his thesis here.

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Kreiman Lab News

Congratulations to Camille Gollety on her thesis!

Camille Gollety
Camille Gollety

Neuronal correlates of rapid learning in a human visual memory task. Camille Gollety. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (2022). 

Read her thesis here.

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Kreiman Lab News

Scientists discover specific neurons involved in making memories

In a new study, intracranial electrodes helped reveal the cells in our brains and the neurological mechanisms responsible for memory creation.
By Conor Feehly

Link to article in Discover Magazine (PDF)

Zheng J, Schjetnan AGP, Yebra M, Mosher C, Kalia S, Valiante TA, Mamelak A, Kreiman G, Rutishauser U (2022). Cognitive boundary signals in the human medial temporal lobe shape episodic memory representation. Nature Neuroscience, 25:358-368

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Kreiman Lab News

Congratulations to Yael Porte on her thesis!

Yael Porte
Yael Porte

Comparing neural responses between action execution and action perception. Yael Porte. Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Laussanne (EPFL) (2022). 

Read her thesis here.

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Kreiman Lab News

Task-specific neural processes underlying conflict resolution during cognitive control

Lab Results talk by Yuchen Xiao

Wed Jan 19th, 9:30am

Everyday decisions require integrating sensory cues and task demands while resolving conflict in goals and cues (e.g., “should I go for a run or stay home and watch a movie?”). The ability to exert cognitive control during decision-making plays a fundamental role in our daily activities, as demonstrated by the debilitating effects of malfunction in control networks. Predominant theories of cognitive control posit universal mechanisms of conflict resolution. The results of the current study challenge this dogma by demonstrating that the neural circuits involved in orchestrating cognitive control are specific to the combination of inputs and outputs in each task.